Nepal trekking area fees & permits

Nepal Trekking Permits and Fees (2024)

 

Introduction

With Suman, embarking on a trek in Nepal promises breathtaking landscapes and cultural immersion. And the trekking permits and fees are all included in your booking price.
So you don’t have to worry about this document.

However, for some people, understanding the permit and fee requirements is essential for a smooth and enjoyable experience. This guide aims to demystify the process, providing detailed insights into the permits and fees involved for trekking in Nepal’s high-altitude regions.

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A/ Types of Permits

When planning a high-altitude trek in Nepal, several permits are necessary, including:

  1. Trekking Information Management System (TIMS) Card
  2. Restricted-Area Trekking Permit
  3. Entry Permit into National Parks
  4. Conservation Areas Permit
  5. Rural Municipality Trekking Permit (for certain regions)

While not all permits are required for every trek, it’s crucial to understand which ones apply to your chosen route.

 

1. TIMS Cards

For many trek routes, such as the Annapurna Circuit and Everest Base Camp treks, obtaining a TIMS card is essential. Administered by the Trekking Agencies’ Association of Nepal, the TIMS system aims to regulate the trekking industry and ensure trekkers’ safety. TIMS card fees vary based on the trekkers’ nationality:

Trekker Cost per person

Non-SAARC trekker NPR 2,000 / US$17
SAARC* trekker NPR 1,000 / US$7.50

* SAARC countries, includes : Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.

1.1 Where to Purchase TIMS Cards

Trekkers can obtain TIMS cards at the Tourist Service Centre (Pokhara, Katmandou, etc.), providing essential information such as trek itinerary, emergency contact details, and insurance policy information.

1.2 What You Need to Apply for a TIMS Card

Your TIMS card contains information like your country of residence, your trek route, your trek company, and a local emergency contact number. You cannot apply for a TIMS card until you have the following:

  1. Your entry and exit dates for Nepal
  2. Your trek’s entry and exit points
  3. A detailed trek itinerary
  4. A local emergency contact number
  5. A home-country emergency contact number
  6. Your insurance policy number
  7. A copy of your passport
  8. Two passport-style photos

 

2. Restricted-Area Trekking Permits

You usually don’t need a TIMS card if you’re trekking in a restricted area like the Lower Dolpo or Nar–Phu region. Instead, you need to purchase a restricted-area trekking permit. Some restricted areas charge a daily fee, others a weekly fee, and still others a combination of the two. Upper Mustang, for instance, requires $500 for the first 10 days, after which you’re charged $50 for every subsequent day. Restricted-area trekking permits are needed when you plan to walk in one of the following regions:

  • Humla
  • Kanchenjunga
  • Manaslu
  • Nar–Phu Valleys
  • Tsum Valley
  • Lower Dolpo
  • Upper Dolpo
  • Upper Mustang

2.1 Where to Purchase a Restricted-Area Permit

Suman will obtain the restricted-area permits for you. You can’t trek in a restricted area on your own. If you’re a solo traveler wanting to visit a restricted area, you’ll need to find a tour operator to put you with at least one other trekker wishing to hike the same route.

3. National Park Permits

Every high-altitude trek in Nepal takes place within a national park or a conservation area. The Annapurna Circuit, for instance, takes place within the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA). And the Everest Base Camp trek takes place almost entirely within Sagarmatha National Park.
All of Nepal’s national parks have a once-off entrance fee of NPR 3,000 (around US$23). The fee is the same for every national park. You also pay the fee just once, regardless of how long you stay in the park.

3.1 Where to Purchase Your National Park Entry Permit

In terms of national parks, an entry permit is easy obtain. You can purchase it:

  • At the park’s entrance gate
  • Online from the national parks office
  • At the Tourist Service Centre in Kathmand

When paying the fee in advance, you’re issued your permit on the spot.

3.2 What You Need to Purchase an Entry Permit

To be allowed to enter a national park, you’ll need to provide the following:

  • A detailed trek itinerary
  • Entry and exit dates for the park
  • The name and address of your tour operator (if you have one)
  • The name and contact details of your trek guide (if you have one)

 

4. Conservation Area Permits

Similarly to national parks, you simply need to pay a once-off fee to obtain an entry permit for a conservation area. This fee is NPR 3,000 (or around US$23). And again, your permit is issued on the spot. The most famous – and largest – conservation area in Nepal is the Annapurna Conservation Area.

4.1 Where to Purchase Your Conservation Area Entry Permit

You can obtain a conservation area entry permit at:

  • The Tourist Service Centre in Kathmandu
  • The Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation in Kathmandu
  • The Annapurna Conservation Area Project (ACAP) office in Pokhara
  • The Nepal Tourism Board office in Besisahar or Pokhara

While you can pay the fee at a checkpoint, you’ll be charged double the usual amount. So it’s better to organize it in advance at one of the above-mentioned offices.

4.2 What You Need to Purchase an Entry Permit for a Conservation Area

To be allowed to enter a conservation area, you’ll need to provide the following:

  • A detailed trek itinerary
  • Entry and exit dates for the conservation area
  • The name and address of your tour operator (if you have one)
  • The name and contact details of your trek guide (if you have one)
  • Two passport-style photos

 

5. Rural Municipality Trekking Permits

Some municipalities charge trekkers an additional fee. Notably, those trekking to Everest Base Camp must purchase the Khumbu Rural Municipality Permit. At NPR 2,000 (or $17), this isn’t a headache at all.

5.1 Where to Pay Municipality Fees

Municipality trekking permits are obtained at the checkpoint to each municipality.

 

B/ List of Permits and Fees for Specific Treks

Let’s now look at each of Nepal’s most popular treks and what permits and fees are required for each to help you plan and budget. We’ve placed them in alphabetical order to help you scroll and find the ones that interest you. These prices are for « Westerners ». Note that Nepali and SAARC citizens pay lower rates than those stated below.

1. Annapurna Conservation Area Treks

Here’s what you’ll pay for permits and fees to do any one of the following Annapurna Conservation Area treks:

  • Annapurna Base Camp
  • Annapurna Circuit
  • Annapurna Sanctuary
  • Poonhill
  • Mardi Himal
Permit Cost per person
TIMS cardUS$17

Annapurna Conservation Area permit

US$25

Total cost:

US$42

 

2. Nar–Phu and Annapurna Circuit Trek

Permit Cost per person
Annapurna Conservation Area permitUS$25
Nar–Phu restricted-area permit (Peak season)

US$100 for the first week,
US$15 for every day thereafter

(Off-peak season)
US$75 for the first week,
US$15 for every day thereafter

Total cost:

Varies



3. Upper Mustang Trek

Permit Cost per person
Annapurna Conservation Area permitUS$25
Upper Mustang restricted-area permit

US$500 per day for the first 10 days,

US$50 per day thereafter

Total cost:

Varies


 

4. Everest Base Camp Treks

Here’s what you’ll pay for permits and fees for any of the following Everest Base Camp treks:

  • Classic EBC trek
  • EBC trek and helicopter return
  • EBC and Gokyo Lakes trek
  • EB and Three Passes trek
Permit Cost per person
TIMS cardUS$17
Sagarmatha National Park Permit

US$28

Khumbu Rural Municipality Permit

US$17

Total cost:

US$63

 

5. Treks in Langtang National Park

Here’s what you’ll pay for permits and fees for the following treks inside Langtang National Park:

  • Ganga La trek
  • Gosainkund trek
  • Helambu Circuit trek
  • Langtang Valley trek
Permit Cost per person
TIMS cardUS$17

Langtang National Park permit

US$25

Total cost:

US$42

 

6. Kanchenjunga Base Camp Trek

Cost per person
TIMS cardUS$17
Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Permit

US$25

Restricted-area permit

US$20 per week (for the first four weeks),
US$25 per week thereafter

Total cost:

Varies

 

7. Treks in Shey Phoksundo National Park

Here’s what you’ll pay to do the Kagmara La trek permits and fees:

Permit Cost per person
TIMS cardUS$17

Shey Phoksundo National Park

US$28

Total cost:

US$45

And here’s what you’ll pay for permits and fees to do any of these other treks inside Shey Phoksundo National Park:

  • Lower Dolpo
  • Phoksundo Lake
  • Phoksundo Lake via Do Tarap
  • Phoksundo Lake to Shey Gompa
Permit Cost per person
Shey Phoksundo National Park permitUS$28
Lower Dolpo restricted-area permit

US$20 per week for first four weeks,
US$5 for every week thereafter

Total cost:

Varies

8. Upper Dolpo Trek

Permit Cost per person
Shey Phoksundo National Park permitUS$28
Upper Dolpo restricted-area permit

US$500 per day for the first 10 days,
US$50 for every day thereafter

Total cost:

Varies

9. Makalu Base Camp Trek

To do the Makalu Base Camp trek, you should budget:

Permit Cost per person
Makalu Barun National Park permitUS$25
Makalu Rural Municipality Permit

US$17

Total cost:

US$42

10. Manaslu Conservation Area Treks

For treks such as the Manaslu Circuit trek and the Tsum Valley trek, the permits and fees are as follows:

Permit Cost per person
Manaslu Conservation Area permitUS$25
Manaslu restricted-area permit (Peak season)

US$100 for the first week,
$15 for every day thereafter

(Off-peak season)
US$75 for the first week,
$10 for every day thereafter

Total cost:

Varies

You can look at Nepal’s Department of Immigration website for any updates or further info with regards to trekking permits and fees.

Conclusion

With Suman, you have nothing to worry about all these permits.
You just need to lay back and enjoy your vacation.

Planning a trek in Nepal involves navigating various permit and fee requirements, depending on the chosen route and region. Understanding these requirements and obtaining the necessary permits is essential for a safe and enjoyable trekking experience.

Om Shanti